The Frequent Traveler’s Guide to Electric Razors

Every man who is a regular traveler or is constantly on-the-go can certainly use one of these because of the convenience they provide. They can last for as many uses as possible, and can be used even without shaving cream or a bathroom sink and mirror.

Electric razors have a few advantages over traditional blade razors, the first one being that they are much easier and safer to use. Another reason why these razors are great is because they can be used almost anywhere as long as the batteries are charged or as long as there is an electrical outlet.

Trimming is also an advantage that electric razors have that traditional razors don’t – if you’re simply looking to trim your facial hair instead of shaving it entirely, an electric razor allows you to do this with ease.

Types of Electric Razors
There are at least two types of electric razors – foil and rotary. There are a few notable differences about them that you should keep in mind when choosing between the two.

• Rotary Shaver – They are best used if your facial skin is regular or tough. For instance, if you’re already a bit older or have been shaving for a while, rotary shavers should suit you just fine. They are also good for reaching areas such as your chin or neck, which can often be difficult.

Essentially, they are ideal for men with thick or long facial hair and don’t plan on shaving every day.

• Foil – Foil shavers are what give you a close shave, which makes it ideal for men who need that clean-shaven appearance in the office setting every day.

Foil electric razors should also be a must-have if your skin is sensitive and you have finer hair. This is because they are designed with a thinner layer of metal that covers the actual blades themselves, which results in a gentle shave.

How to Use Them
Using electric razors can be really easy and can actually give you a closer shave than you would using a regular cartridge or disposable razor – all you need is to plug it in or insert the necessary batteries, and you’re good to start shaving.

Washing your face before using the razor may not be necessary, but it does help to smoothen your facial hair and your beard, which in turn helps to give you a closer, cleaner, and smoother shave. Depending on where your facial hair is growing, you may have to shave along or against the grain.

Once you’re done, clean your electric razor regularly (though you may need to remove the batteries or unplug the razor before running water through the blades to get the hairs out) and keep the metal pieces between the cutter and the screen lubricated.

How to Keep Your Straight Razor Sharp in 4 Easy Steps

Using a straight razor is equally as daring as it is rewarding, and keeping it sharp not only keeps it safe (as dull blades can often result in a more dangerous and painful shave for your face), but it also ensures that it will last you for a long time.

To keep your straight razor in its peak condition, all you need to do is follow these simple steps:

Step 1. Invest in a quality razor. This is the first step to making sure that your razor will last you a long time. Flimsy blades that aren’t made well are likely to have burrs after a few shaves that may end up injuring you if you’re not careful.

Step 2. Dry the razor after each use. Even carbon steel will eventually rust when left over time, and this process can be made faster when exposed to water. Be sure to dry the razor with a clean cloth after use before folding it back on itself.

Step 3. Remember to strop your blade. While you don’t have to strop your blade every time you shave, it does help to keep the edge sharp and safe to use. The strop often has two sides: a leather side and a canvas side, and is used to help smooth out the edges and keep the shaving process comfortable.

Step 4. Hone your blade. You can choose to invest in a quality four-thousand/eight-thousand grit whetstone from your nearest hardware store. Ceramic stones are also a viable way to hone your blade and keep the edge from developing burrs that could be damaging on the next shave.

Parts of a Straight Razor
There are two main parts to a straight razor that you should keep in mind: the blade and the handle. They are connected to each other by a pivot pin.

The blade itself is composed of the following parts: head, point, edge, back, shoulder, heel, shank, tang, and tail/toe. All these define how the blade should be held in your hand that you can adjust your grip on.

Types of Straight Razor Points
Blades are categorized according to point, type, or nose, such as the following:

• Square – Used for precise shaving in small areas
• Round – The point profile is semicircular; more forgiving and is recommended for new users
• French point – The point profile resembles a quarter circle but ends in a point with a sharp angled curve, and is often used to help shave spots
• Spanish point – The point profile has a rounded tip that is connected to its spine via a concave arch
• Barber’s notch – Similar to the Spanish point, but has a larger rounded tip and a smaller concave arch

5 Things You Should Clean Once a Week at Home

Perhaps, you already knew what you should clean everyday at home. Fortunately, there are a few things that require less of your attention. Here are seven things you can do on a weekly basis when it comes to keeping your home clean.

Kitchen Appliances
Your fridge, stove and other kitchen appliances may not look obviously dirty, but it’s likely covered in things that aren’t very visible from a distance. Your microwave and stove are likely covered in food bits and fingerprints that may slowly build up into grime if not regularly cleaned. To avoid that annoying build up, wipe them clean with disinfectant wipes or a clean sponge at least once a week.

Laundry
Yes, we know. It is everybody’s least favourite household chore—but it needs to get done. To make the chore easier (and faster!), get the family to pitch in. Keep separate baskets for light light-colored and dark-colored clothing, and ask everyone to place their laundry in the appropriate bins every time. That way, one step is already off the list before you even actually start tackling them.

Shower and Tub
These constantly warm and wet places are breeding grounds for scum and mildew when not cleaned regularly. So, make sure to make some time every week to help your shower and tub resist stains. After washing, we recommend running a squeegee over the surfaces to keep it dry while it’s not yet in use.

Bathroom Surfaces
This includes the counters, mirrors and the sink. Why? Let’s just say, all thanks to your toilet, your bathroom is constantly nasty. If you leave your toilet lid up, germs and bacteria can spray up to six feet every time you flush the toilet. So, keep the toilet lid down after every use, then clean and disinfect surfaces at least once a week to keep your bathroom sanitary.

Dusty Furniture
Dust build-up does not only look bad, it can also be potentially damaging to your furniture. Dust can cause fine scratches to surfaces if something rubs against it. When cleaning, do not just use dry cloth since it only moves the dust around. Use a furniture polish, spray cleaner or water to dampen your duster or cloth.

Whether you choose to tackle all these things on a Sunday or assign one for each day of the week, these chores are totally manageable for you and your family.

5 Most Famous Streets in the World

Each tourist attraction offers a unique view and meaning to people. The same thing applies to the thousand of streets in the world that claim to be among the most famous in the world.

Here are five world-famous streets that are frequently photographed and visited by tourists for different reasons.

1. Las Vegas Strip
The gambling capital of the world, sits in the middle of the southern Nevada desert. Casinos are everywhere in Las Vegas, but it is in this strip stretching along Las Vegas Boulevard South where most of the city’s casinos can be found. The strip features gigantic casino hotels, decorated with lavish lights and details to mimic a fantasy-like atmosphere.

2. Champs-Elysées
However, for romantic lights and attractions, Paris’ Champs-Elysées beats the previous strip. This famous avenue attracts tourists, particularly honeymooners, because of its beautiful night lights and chic little shops and cafes located throughout area. The western end of the popular street leads to the Arc de Triomphe, which is another popular spot wherein visitors can climb for a breathtaking view of the Champs-Elysées.

3. Orchard Road
Orchard Road is the world-famous shopping district in Singapore. Named after the orchard of fruits that the street led to, Orchard Road is decked with malls, upscale restaurants, cafes, hotels and nightclubs. During the holiday season, the street becomes a Christmas venue with its over the top lights and decorations, with reindeers on palm trees and gingerbread houses covered in fake snow.

4. Abbey Road
If you’re a The Beatles fan, you’re probably familiar with their iconic album cover where George, Ringo, Paul and John cross a pedestrian. That pedestrian is located at London’s Abbey Road, which happened to be the album’s name as well. Because of it being their best-selling album—and the last one they had before disbanding—the street became a world-famous attraction where people come here to recreate their own version of Abbey Road album.

5. Hollywood Walk of Fame
Who doesn’t know the Hollywood Walk of Fame? This landmark in Los Angeles immortalizes the stars of Hollywood by embedding their names in pink star plaques in charcoal terrazzo squares along the walkway of the boulevard. Over 2,400 actors, musicians, directors, producers and other significant names in the entertainment industry have been commemorated in this famous avenue.

Have you been to any of these world-renowned streets? If not, where would you wish to go first?

4 Book Havens for Bookworms

Books are a delightful past time. In a pinch, they can also make for great gifts to give to friends and loved ones. There are a lot of bookshops here in SG, some of them large and well-known, some of them small and niche. Here are some of them.

1. BooksActually
BooksActually has a large selection with a lot of different genres that you could choose from. Their selection ranges from popular literary works, to obscure rare editions. Home to the largest collection of Singapore literary titles, you could be sure that every bookworm has something for them. Even if you don’t find anything that interests you, those in the mood for adventure will delight in their book vending machines, where you can let fate decide on what book you’ll be reading today.

BooksActually is located at 9 Yong Siak Street and is open on Sundays and Mondays from 10 am to 6 pm, and on Tuesdays to Saturdays from 10 am to 8 pm.

2. Kinokuniya
Kinokuniya is the biggest bookstore here in Singapore, usually attracting more than 200,000 visitors per month. They stock books from many genres, from fiction to non-fiction. They also have magazines, CDs, and stationaries. Starting out as a Japanese bookstore in 1983, Kinokuniya still carries Japanese merchandise until today; fans of Japanese culture can find Japanese books, stationery and magazines here in Kinokuniya.

Kinokuniya has four locations: Ngee Ann City, Liang Court, Bugis Junction, and JEM.

3. Times Bookstore
Times Bookstore is another major book retail chain here in SG. They offer books on a wide selection and specialize in travel books like guidebooks, travel maps, and travel-related items. Those who want to immerse themselves in the literary scene of Singapore would be delighted in the number of events that Times Bookstore often hosts, like meet the author sessions, performance storytelling, and book signing sessions.

4. Littered With Books
Littered With Books has a quirky, off-beat atmosphere that bookworms are sure to delight in. Located in a small and quaint two-storey space, Littered With Books is an inviting space. You can peruse its shelves and choose from different categories, with its fiction selection on the first floor and its non-fiction selection on its second floor. They have seating available for those who would like to sit down and read and have friendly staff members to whom you could ask for assistance and book recommendations.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Coloring Your Hair

Nothing beats the occasional hair swap to instantly freshen up your looks, especially when your life revolves around a fixed schedule (and no, we’re not talking about getting a toupee).

While dye jobs straight out of a kit aren’t as different from getting your crowning glory tinted at a salon, it can be difficult if it’s you’re first time! Here are the dos and don’ts of dyeing your hair at home:

Dos
Find the right formula.

Much like a skin care routine, not all products are good for all types. The same goes with your hair – you need to find the right formula that goes the best with your natural hair color and skin tone.

Read the label.
Always read the label to make sure that the color you’re planning to use is safe and authentic. Check if there are ingredients in the dye that you may be allergic to, as well as the instructions on how to properly apply them.

Keep taking care of your hair.
The makeover isn’t over after you rinse the dye – take care of your hair with conditioning masks and regular trims to make sure it stays glossy and bouncy.

Set realistic expectations for your hair.
It’s all about the baby steps – you can’t make a drastic change to your hair color overnight. It has limits, and it’s important that you know what these are before going ahead and dyeing your hair.

Although coloring has never been easier, you really don’t want to spend money and end up only damaging your luscious locks in the process.

Don’ts
Color your hair black to cover light or grey hair.

Doing this will not only make the dye difficult to remove, but will also be difficult to change color for your hair later on.

Bleach your hair by yourself.
You may be tempted to use over-the-counter bleach “just to try it out”, the process itself can be tricky and doing it wrong can permanently damage your hair.

Apply hair color like shampoo.
Dye doesn’t work that way, and doing that will only result in a terrible dye job and maybe even damage your hair. Instead, make sure to apply the dye at the roots of your hair first, and use the brush that comes with the kit to apply it properly.

The same way goes with shampooing your hair – don’t do it too often. Once or twice a week is recommended, but every other day should also be good if you have oily or fine hair.