5 Ways to Use Castile Soap in Your Beauty Routine

Castile soap has become a staple ingredient for homemade household cleaning products—all for good reasons! It’s eco-friendly, vegan and chemical-free. And because of it’s environmentally safe and organic nature, it has also made its way to our beauty routine.

So, if you have liquid castile soap seating in the kitchen, here are five more ways you can use it for your skin, hair and nails.

1. Facial Cleanser
Keeping a sensitive skin clean can be challenging with traditional drugstore face wash products. Thankfully, you can make your own gentle facial cleanser at home with liquid castile soap. Get a foaming soap dispenser and fill it up with a quarter cup of castile, half a cup of distilled water and a teaspoon each of vegetable glycerine and jojoba oil. Secure the dispenser with its lid, shake gently to mix and use it in the morning and at night.

2. Body Wash
A thorough facial cleanser, castile soap can also be used as a body wash. Create your own peppermint liquid soap with three-fourths cup of castile soap, a quarter cup of vegetable glycerine, a teaspoon of coconut oil and about 10 drops of peppermint oil. With its gentle ingredients, you can use this every day in the shower. Use it with bath sponge for easy lathering.

3. Shaving Aid
In a blender, blend a quarter cup each of castile soap and rose water and two tablespoons of liquified coconut oil. You can also add about five drops of tea tree oil if you like. Store in a pump bottle in the shower. To use as shaving aid, get a pump of the product in your palm, and apply it on the area you want to shave. Then, shave your way to a smooth, soft and well-moisturized skin.

4. Make-Up Brush Cleaner
Remove germs, dead skin cells and build up of products from your make-up brushes. In a regular size mason jar, mix a solution of one tablespoon of castile soap, half a cup of water and 10 drops of tea tree oil. Soak your brushes into the jar and leave them there for 15 minutes. After which, rinse them in cold water and let them dry.

5. Cuticle Softener
Create a homemade solution for your discolored and brittle nails and peeling cuticles with castile soap. All you need is a medium-sized bowl where you can mix half a cup of water, two tablespoons of olive oil, a teaspoon of castile soap and a tablespoon of lemon juice. Stir the mixture until frothy, and then soak your nails for 10 minutes. Discard the solution afterwards, and moisturize your nails and cuticles with jojoba oil.

These are just a few of the many ways you can use liquid castile soap. You can explore and try your own unique combinations, too. Another great thing about castile soap is it blends well with almost any ingredient you’d commonly find in your kitchen.

Here’s What You Need to Know Before Exfoliating Your Skin

If you have sensitive skin, you probably never get attracted to facial scrubs as you might think it can only exacerbate redness. If you’re acne-prone, the more you don’t want to disturb those breakouts, right? Wrong. It turns out that exfoliating can be beneficial to all skin types.

Here, we will tackle the most common questions about exfoliating, so you can find the best routine that will give you youthful and glowing skin.

1. “I have dry skin. Should I exfoliate?”
Yes, you should! In fact, flaky skin inhibits full penetration of your skin care products. Additionally, build up of oil and dirt can clog the pores and cause pimple-like bumps. The ideal way to exfoliate, though, is to use gentle chemical exfoliators or a light face scrub that has super-fine granules. After exfoliating, follow up with hydrating lotion or a thick moisturizer to restore your face’s moisture.

2. “My skin is too sensitive. Will exfoliating exacerbate it?”
Gritty particles are definitely a no-no, but most skin types can benefit from mild facial scrubs with fine exfoliators. Consider products rich in plant or fruit enzymes to gently deep clean the skin. These products offer gentle enzymatic peel with its grained powder that you mix with water. Just make sure not to over exfoliate, or you’ll strip off too much natural oil from your skin.

3. “When should I exfoliate?”
You can exfoliate either in the morning or at night. But if you’re using a scrub with retinol in it, it’s ideal to exfoliate before bed, since your skin is more vulnerable to bacteria as it has shed off a layer. After exfoliating, always remember to apply liberal amount of moisturizer to restore your skin’s moisture.

4. “Can I use my body scrub?”
No. Never use body scrubs on your face as they contain harsher and larger granules, which is specifically designed to exfoliate thicker and tougher skin in the body.

5. “Should I avoid the eye area?”
Some facial scrub, which contain retinol, are specifically formulated for the delicate skin around the eyes. Always read the label to ensure it is safe around your eyes and never use one with coarser granules.

6. “Are all exfoliators the same?”
Exfoliants come in different types. But even so, all helps unveil youthful and more radiant skin. The difference, though, is that manual and chemical exfoliants should be used only once to twice a week, while electronic exfoliants, like Clarisonic, is gentle enough to be used daily.

Regularly exfoliation is good for all skin types—oily, dry, combination or sensitive skin type. The key is to know which kind of exfoliator to use to guarantee best results every time.

5 Beauty Products You’re Wasting Your Money On

Nowadays, we come across new beauty products almost every day, but not all of them are worth spending your money on. You worked hard for every dollar you have, and you deserve something that will give you the most benefits.
To help save your money and use them on more useful and effective products, here are some beauty items to avoid and forget about.

1. Expensive Facial Wash and Cleansers
Cleansers stay on your skin for a short time, so they rarely have much beautifying effects other than removing makeup, dirt and oil—something that any cheap cleanser can do. A more useful investment: an electronic cleansing brush. This battery-operated device has rotating brush heads to provide gentle, yet deeper skin cleansing, getting rid of dirt and oil from seated deep down the pores.

2. Facial Toner
We’ve all heard from beauty gurus to use facial toner to truly cleanse the face. However, according to dermatologists, this is quite unnecessary. That’s because the facial cleanser you washed your face with is especially formulated to not leave any product residue on your facial skin. As a result, buying a toner is something you can completely forget about.

3. Foot Mask
A mask for your feet is another unnecessary beauty expense. There is no reason why your feet would need to be masked. To keep them soft and smooth, all you need to do is to remove dead skin cells by using a scrub and regularly applying any foot cream you can find in the drugstore. Other than that, buying foot masks, especially the expensive ones, is just a waste of money

4. Body-Firming Lotion
How many times have you heard of products promising you to get firmer skin and reduce the appearance of cellulite? The sad truth is, these products will not provide you that magical solution. Even if they contain ingredients that help hydrate the skin and improves its elasticity, they will only provide temporary and minimal results. Save your money from these items and enroll for a gym membership instead.

5. Pore-Shrinking Products
Many product brands and manufacturers honestly advertise what they can do for your face—that is to temporarily minimize the appearance of pores. However, there are also some that go overboard and claim to actually reduce the size of your pores. If you hear this, do not buy it! the size of the pores depends on the genes of an individual, and nothing can change that permanently. While retinoids and AHA are dermatologist-recommended products to unclog and thoroughly cleanse the pores, they cannot shrink them nor make your skin look like that of a newborn.

Are any of these products part of your everyday beauty regimen? If so, try to gauge whether the effects justify the amount of money you’ve spent to buy them. If it tells you otherwise, you might want to save your dollars and spend them on more effective beauty items instead.

The Do’s and Don’ts of Coloring Your Hair

Nothing beats the occasional hair swap to instantly freshen up your looks, especially when your life revolves around a fixed schedule (and no, we’re not talking about getting a toupee).

While dye jobs straight out of a kit aren’t as different from getting your crowning glory tinted at a salon, it can be difficult if it’s you’re first time! Here are the dos and don’ts of dyeing your hair at home:

Dos
Find the right formula.

Much like a skin care routine, not all products are good for all types. The same goes with your hair – you need to find the right formula that goes the best with your natural hair color and skin tone.

Read the label.
Always read the label to make sure that the color you’re planning to use is safe and authentic. Check if there are ingredients in the dye that you may be allergic to, as well as the instructions on how to properly apply them.

Keep taking care of your hair.
The makeover isn’t over after you rinse the dye – take care of your hair with conditioning masks and regular trims to make sure it stays glossy and bouncy.

Set realistic expectations for your hair.
It’s all about the baby steps – you can’t make a drastic change to your hair color overnight. It has limits, and it’s important that you know what these are before going ahead and dyeing your hair.

Although coloring has never been easier, you really don’t want to spend money and end up only damaging your luscious locks in the process.

Don’ts
Color your hair black to cover light or grey hair.

Doing this will not only make the dye difficult to remove, but will also be difficult to change color for your hair later on.

Bleach your hair by yourself.
You may be tempted to use over-the-counter bleach “just to try it out”, the process itself can be tricky and doing it wrong can permanently damage your hair.

Apply hair color like shampoo.
Dye doesn’t work that way, and doing that will only result in a terrible dye job and maybe even damage your hair. Instead, make sure to apply the dye at the roots of your hair first, and use the brush that comes with the kit to apply it properly.

The same way goes with shampooing your hair – don’t do it too often. Once or twice a week is recommended, but every other day should also be good if you have oily or fine hair.

Temporary Hair Removal Techniques

Removing excess hair in some areas of the body has become a trend in the last century and many techniques are available today. This article lists the types of temporary hair removal techniques for men and women.

Shaving

Shaving is cheap and easy. All you need is a razor (disposable, regular, double-edged, electric razor and shaving slip) and a shaving cream (either brushless or lathering) or foam or soap. It doesn’t hurt but the results don’t last long because you’re not removing the hair from the root. It can also cause razor bumps, ingrown hair, rash and itchiness.

Threading

It’s an old technique using a thread to pull out hair by trapping it in a lasso. This method is popular for contouring eyebrows but can be painful. It does not cause damage to the skin and is fast, but doing it on your own takes practice.

Tweezing or Plucking

This takes longer because you need to remove one hair at a time. You’ll need a mirror if you don’t want to strain your neck while pulling armpit hairs. It can be painful and will leave bumps on your skin.

Back Shavers

Some men want to remove hairs on their back. Back shavers look like razors, but have handles that can extend and bend. It’s used like a regular razor.

Waxing

Waxing removes hair from the roots. Two types of wax are available. Soft or strip wax is heated then spread thinly on the skin. Then it’s covered with a non-woven strip or muslin. This strip is removed after a while. Soft wax is used for larger areas. Hard wax on the other hand is given time to cool and harden before it is pulled off from the skin. Hard wax is recommended for sensitive skin. Waxing can sometimes cause ingrown hair, irritation and allergies.

Sugaring

Sugaring uses two types of mixtures; thin and thick. The paste is a mixture of sugar, water and lemon. It is pressed into the skin and pulled. Sugaring can pull out short hairs, has fewer risks of burns and irritation and leaves less trauma on the skin.

Depilatory Creams

Tired of plucking and waxing? Depilatory creams, like shaving, don’t cause pain and can be done at home. The cream dissolves the hair but does not include the roots. However the cream stinks and it can leave dark spots on your skin. There is a different depilatory cream for the body and the face. Experts advise using it when your skin is hydrated, like when you’re bathing.

Epilators

They look like electric razors but they pull out hairs from the roots instead. It’s like tweezing lots of hair at the same time. It’s cheap, simple to use, the hairs don’t grow back right away and it leaves your skin smooth. Like tweezing, using epilators can be painful.

A Guide to Not-So-Common Makeup Products for Clueless Girls  

Let’s face it, not all women are experts in cosmetics. While most of us wear makeup every day, not everyone is well-educated about the uses of every product. In order to clear up any confusion, here’s the guide on some of the most seemingly basic makeup products.

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  1. Luminizer

A luminizer, which comes as a cream, powder, or liquid, is used to give the skin a healthy glow. You can mix a drop of liquid luminizer in your foundation or tinted moisturizer and apply it wherever you think your skin needs more glowing effect (e.g. corners of the eyes, cheekbones).

When shopping, we suggest finding a “finely milled” product or those that provide subtle sheen to the face. Avoid those with chunky glitters as it will only make you look too shiny and unnatural.

  1. CC Cream

Known as “complexion corrector,” CC cream is almost the same with BB cream, just a bit more potent. CC creams correct any discoloration on the skin, while BB creams only smooth everything out.

This product is best used when you’re going out for a quick errand and want to hide any redness in the face. While this can provide enough coverage to hyper-pigmentations, it isn’t long-wearing so not recommended for use if your need your makeup to last for hours.

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  1. Tinted Moisturizer

As the name implies, its primary purpose is to moisturize the skin; but since it’s tinted, it also provides little coverage. This product is your perfect go-to makeup when you just want to even out your skin tone, but doesn’t want the heavy feeling of foundation.

You can apply this with the use of brush or your bare hands. Just apply these all over your face, pair with a bit of lip balm and eye shadow, and you’re good to go.

  1. Setting Spray

Setting spray is used to keep the makeup in place for longer hours. You won’t have to worry about your foundation, concealer, or eye shadow melting because you know it stays where you applied them.

For application, hold the product about an arm’s length from your face. Spray a couple of times and let it dry. A quick tip: look for a setting spray with glycine to help take away the cakey or powdery finish of the makeup.

Makeup can be confusing. However, what we’re sure of is that all of them are made to make us look and feel better about ourselves. Give these products a shot and see for yourself the wonders of these products.

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